Club Foot

Covid 19 Update – Kingston clinic open to treat patients in a safe environment

We are fully respecting the Government’s request for social distancing by asking all non-essential staff to work from home, we have also reduced the number of clinicians and manufacturing staff working at any one time in our clinic so they can work safely themselves, whilst continuing to provide an essential service.

If you have a condition that is time dependent – Scoliosis, Plagiocephaly, or Club Foot for example –or have an issue with any lower limb orthotics that is impinging on your quality of life; we suggest that you contact the clinic and ask to set up a Skype consultation with a clinician. You will then be able to assess your immediate options including coming in for an appointment if that is the agreed way forward.

Social distancing at the clinic:

  • We have completely reconfigured the waiting room area so that patients can naturally distance themselves from other patients
  • Patients can ring us from their cars on arrival so that they can be shown directly into a clinic room if they prefer

Hygiene at the clinic:

  • Our clinicians are having their temperature taken when they arrive at the clinic
  • Our clinicians are washing their hands before and after seeing each patient
  • Hand sanitisers are available for customers in reception and in all clinic rooms

What we ask of patients:

  • Please only bring essential members of your family with you
  • Either take your own temperature on arrival or ask a member of staff to take it for you
  • Wash your hands on arrival and departure

Finally: we have our own enclosed car park with direct access to the clinic so that patients do not need to use public transport

Treating Club Foot

Club foot or clubfoot, is a term for the medical condition congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV). It is a congenital deformity involving one foot or both. It is relatively common, affecting around one in every 1,000 babies born in the UK. Both feet are affected in around half of the children born with the condition. The affected foot appears to have been rotated internally at the ankle. The foot points downwards and inwards, with the soles of the feet facing backward.

Without treatment, people with club feet often appear to walk on their ankles or on the sides of their feet. 

While a baby is young, there is a natural flexibility that can be utilised to get things back to where they belong. In most cases the foot will respond well to conservative correction using the Ponseti method which involves manipulation, serial casting and a very small procedure to release the tight Achilles tendon at the back of the ankle. There follows a long period of maintenance of the corrected position of the feet, traditionally this has been achieved with what is called the boots and bar approach. LOC is pioneering a the use of a different brace in this final phase of treatment – the Cunningham Brace.


 

Enquire about Clubfoot

 

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