Pectus Excavatum Case Histories
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Pectus Excavatum Case Histories

LOC is a pioneer of non-surgical treatment for pectus excavatum in the UK. We are proud to have achieved positive results for our patients. We are grateful that several of our patients and their parents have given us permission to share their scans.

We treat pectus excavatum conservatively with a bespoke orthosis known as the dynamic chest compressor, in combination with vacuum bell therapy, together with a daily exercise programme. The compressor helps to correct rib flaring, a common symptom of pectus excavatum. The vacuum bell works in tandem by creating a vacuum over the depressed sternum area to lift the sunken part of the chest out.

Other anatomic hallmarks of pectus excavatum include flared ribs, pot belly and rounded shoulders due to poor posture, all of which can become more prominent as a child or teenager grows older.  

 

Patient A

Left: pectus excavatum before treatment. Right: after bracing, you can notice some bruising where the dynamic chest compressor sits over the ribsLeft: pectus excavatum before treatment. Right: after bracing, you can notice some bruising where the dynamic chest compressor sits over the ribs.

 

Patient B

Patient B came to us when he was 19 years old for pectus excavatum treatmentpectus excavatum bracing treatment - before and after chest scansPatient B came to us when he was 19 years old. His first appointment was 26/06/2015 and his last appointment was 11/08/2017

 

Patient C

pectus excavatum bracing treatment - before and after scanspectus excavatum chest scan - before and after treatment

Patient C came to us when he was 15 years old and the length of treatment was one year.

If you think you or your child is showing signs of pectus excavatum and would like to have an assessment, we offer a free, no obligation first consultation.

In this consultation, an LOC clinician will examine all aspects of your chest and posture, and assess whether treatment is necessary and whether your chest wall is flexible enough to respond to treatment.

For more information about the condition you can visit our pectus excavatum page, or contact us to book your free initial consultation today.

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